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Monthly Archives: May 2017

#Biafra at 50: Effects Of Another War Will Be Unbearable

When I visited the National War Museum in Umuahia, the Abia state capital, last year, my intention was to learn more about the civil war in Biafra over 40 years ago; however, I ended up being depressed. I was not just depressed because the museum did not meet the international standards, or because many Nigerians — especially the youths — ...

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Democracy Day: 6 Key Things Ag President Yemi Osinbajo Said in His Speech

Nigeria’s democracy clocks 18 today. After decades of military rule, with just a brief period of democratic government, Nigeria finally returned to democracy in 1999. And since then, there have been four consecutive governments– 16 years of PDP rule and 2 years of the APC (with 2 more years to go under the current dispensation). In his 2017 democracy day ...

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Like Ethiopia, Nigeria Can Also Be Transformed Within 10 Years. But How?

Within a decade, the story of Ethiopia, Africa’s second-most populous nation, changed from that of hopelessness to uncommon transformation and development. Standing as the only African country to defeat a European colonial power and retain its sovereignty, Ethiopia has a mixed story of the Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Between 1970s and 2003, Ethiopia passed through various forms of ...

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Channels Int’l Kids Cup: ACP School from Ogun Defeats Kwara’s Burahanudeen

African Church Central Primary School from Ogun State defeated their counterparts, Burahanudeen LGEA Primary School, from Kwara to win the Channels International Kids Cup. AC Central beat their rivals from Kwara State 6-5 on penalties after a goalless draw. The keenly contested match took place at the Campos Square mini stadium in Lagos Island on Saturday, May 27. AC Central beat their ...

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Jose Mourinho or Arsene Wenger, Who Does It Better? [Nigerians React]

Exactly two weeks ago, I did a Twitter poll to know who is the better coach between Jose Mourinho and Arsene Wenger, two of the biggest managers in the world. Little did I know that events of the next few days would make the results of my poll even more complicated. In your candid opinion, who do you think is ...

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Lagos at 50: Three Reasons Why Africa’s Biggest City Stands Out

Lagos, the city with its adjoining conurbation, is the largest in Nigeria, as well as on the African continent. Home to over 20 million people, Lagos remains the economic nerve centre of Nigeria and the economic hub of Africa. Lagos is the land of opportunities Ebi Atawodi, general manager of Uber Nigeria told CNN in 2016 that after only 16 ...

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#ChildrensDay 2017: Is there any Hope for the Nigerian Child?

With over 10 million children out of school, child labour and child abuses at its peak, tens of thousands of children beggars and street children, rising level of sexual harassment and abandonment of children, growing up in Nigeria is no doubt exceedingly challenging. Going down the memory lane, I remember clearly how we used to recite the melodious “Parents listen ...

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Amina Mohammed: The Nigerian Who Helped to Coin the United Nations 17 SDGs from About 500

Eldest of five daughters and a mother of six children, Amina Mohammed is the former Nigerian minister of environment and the current Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations. In a recent interview, Ms. Amina revealed how she once vowed to walk from Kaduna to Zaria– which is 76km– to raise funds to study hotel catering management in Italy, after her ...

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Channels International Kids Cup: Kwara to Face Ogun in Finals

Burhanudeen LGEA primary school, Kwara State will be contending against African Church Central Primary School, Ogun in the final of the Channels International Kids Cup. The boys from Ogun State had defeated their Lagos counterparts, Xplanter Private School from Ikorodu 2-1 in the first semi-final match, courtesy of a brace from Qudus Oloyede. However, in the other match, Burhanudeen LGEA ...

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#AfricaDay: What If We Told You the First University Was in Africa?

Founded by a Muslim woman, the University of Al Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco, opened its doors in 859. The university is no doubt older than Egypt’s Azhar University (970) and its European counterparts: the University of Oxford, which is regarded as the oldest university in the English-speaking world (roughly founded in 1096), and University of Bologna (founded approximately in 1088). ...

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